Feb 082015
 
 With surroundings like this I couldn't give up on photography.

With surroundings like this I couldn’t give up on photography.

 Heading out to shoot some stills and videos. See the video below to learn how my system works.

Heading out to shoot some stills and videos.


In my previous post, I explained that losing nearly all the muscles in my hands and arms and taken away my ability to hold the camera and press the shutter. Today I am happy to report that my occupational therapist has created a system that attaches to my wheelchair and restores my ability to do photography. Actually, it turns my wheelchair into a rolling tripod. Couple that with the ability to tilt, elevate, and roll, and my new system gives me more capabilities for taking stills and videos than before. Please watch the video below to see how it all comes together.
Occupational therapist John MancIl and his bag of tricks.

Occupational therapist John MancIl and his bag of tricks.

Dec 232014
 

This photo shows why I haven’t been able to take photos lately.

Inclusion body myositis has left my hands weak and disfigured.

Inclusion body myositis has left my hands weak and disfigured.

Recently I have not had much to say. No, let me correct that. I have not been saying much. I do have a lot to talk about, however I am trying to make some more adaptations to keep up with the progress inclusion body myositis is making on my body. The effects are especially noticeable on my hands and fingers, shoulders, and the ability to speak, sing and swallow. I recently got approval to go on home health and have started receiving regular visits from a speech therapist, occupational therapist and physical therapist.

Not only are my hands and fingers week, they are nearly frozen in one position. this has caused me to temporarily give up photography altogether. Some of you may recall that in the beginning I was using either my iPhone camera or my GoPro camera which was controlled by my iPhone using the GoPro app. I can no longer hold the iPhone in my hand and use my other hand to touch the screen, so that rules out both of those methods of taking pictures. My occupational therapist is working with me to try to find a system that will solve this. When he does (and I am sure he will; he is very clever and persistent) I will do an article about the method used.

My occupational therapist is also working with me to expand upon a scheme I devised to restore some movement in my fingers. I played the piano from the age of three. It was one of my great pleasures and a favorite method of relaxation. IBM took that away from me several years ago. There is a piano in the common area at my assisted-living facility and occasionally I peck away with the one finger of my right hand that is still strong enough to press a key. So I decided to purchase an electronic keyboard, a Yamaha PSR E443, that would always be waiting for me in the “office” of my assisted-living apartment. My theory was that I would be so motivated to produce music that I would play it often and perhaps expand my ability to move the fingers on my right hand. Even more ambitious, I was hoping to be able to use at least one finger on my left hand to take advantage of the auto accompaniment function of the keyboard. However, the extreme weakness of my left shoulder prevents me from using my left hand unless I lean to the right and lock my shoulder in place. Doing that leaves me unable to use my right hand. After working with my keyboard about one month, my right hand acquired enough dexterity that I can play two notes at once using the index and middle finger and then add a third note with my thumb. This is a major increase in hand function and it is also paying off with things as simple as picking up an object from my desk. I am also now able to use two fingers on my left hand, although I have not been able to overcome the problem of lifting that hand and using it in conjunction with my right hand. My occupational therapist believes this is a therapy worth pursuing and he is now working on a system that might allow me to make more use of my left hand by supporting my left arm and leaving my hand free to move. If this works out, it will also be the subject of a blog post.

My physical therapist is trying to loosen up my neck muscles which are so tight that I can no longer turn my head enough to see behind me. This is a big problem when you need to back up a 350 pound wheelchair. My speech therapist is working with me on strengthening the muscles used for swallowing and is teaching me ways to avoid further damage to my weakened vocal cords.

Early next year, I will let you know how everything is going. Meanwhile I wish you all a good holiday season and an even better New Year.

Jul 212013
 

Mike wearing GoPro

Here I am wearing my new camera. I just have to be careful not to nod my head if somebody waves to me!

Every time I think I have hit upon a pastime that I can continue to pursue despite the progression of my illness, I discover how wrong I was. When I was forced to give up work, I took up painting. That lasted for 10 years until my arms and hands became too weak to guide a brush. So I decided to take up writing a blog. But that meant I had to overcome the weakness of my fingers – fortunately voice-recognition was improving and it is a pretty good substitute. However the other part of writing a blog is photography. Over the past few months my hands and arms have become too weak to hold the camera or cell phone and press a shutter. Since part of my new “job” now that I am living at Huntington Manor assisted living is maintaining their website and blog, photography is a very important part of my work. I was about ready to throw up my hands and quit (except I cannot throw up my hands anymore) but then I was watching a NASCAR race and one of the cars was sponsored by GoPro. I had heard the name before and knew that it was some kind of camera system, so I looked it up on the Internet. I discovered that the GoPro was a very compact camera that had been designed by surfers to allow them to make videos of their rides. It soon spread in popularity and was used by skateboarders, skiers, model airplane builders, free base jumpers, and just about anyone who wished to make a video record of their exploits. It came with a waterproof housing of course but that did not interest me so much. What really caught my attention was both its light weight and the fact that it could be controlled remotely using an iPhone app.

I visited my favorite store (Amazon.com), read about the various models and ordered the GoPro Black, the one with the highest resolution. I also ordered the special mounting system that goes around the head. Now I have a camera system that I can take with me without having to hold it in my hands, and I control all of its functions from my iPhone resting on my lap. I have been using it for a couple of weeks now and have already produced a major video for Huntington Manor as well as taking the number of other photographs. It does not have a zoom, but it has the capability of taking very high resolution video, double the size of high-definition, which means that I can use video editing software to zoom in on sections that I have shot, without winding up with fuzzy, pixelated video. Below are my first videos produced using this camera.

I have included this link to the GoPro camera description on Amazon in case anyone is interested in getting one for themselves. There are three different models, but I highly recommend getting the highest resolution “Black” model which would then allow zooming in postproduction.

This is a video I made about the Huntington Manor Summer Picnic. It includes the food preparation in the kitchen as well as the event itself. All the video was shot with the GoPro camera, and edited using Final Cut Pro Xon my iMac. The background music was created using Band in a Box, The only way I can create music these days is using that program. I can use one finger to type in the chords and a simple melody and it does the rest.

Here is another video shot with the GoPro. I placed it near the bird feeders at Huntington Manor and from a distance waited for the goldfinches to arrive and then started the camera recording. The video was shot at 120 frames per second to produce the slow-motion effect.