Jun 162015
 
Here is my new mattress, following final inspection. You can see the individual air bladders that are inside. Once the cover is pulled over and zipped shot it looks just like a regular mattress. For the curious, the rest of my equipment consists of the electric bed, the pump unit, the DVR, Blu-ray, Roku, smart TV, emergency call button on the wall and one of the supports for the overhead lift system.

Here is my new mattress, following final inspection. You can see the individual air bladders that are inside. Once the cover is pulled over and zipped shut it looks just like a regular mattress. For the curious, the rest of my equipment consists of the electric bed, the pump unit, the DVR, Blu-ray, Roku, smart TV, emergency call button on the wall and one of the supports for the overhead lift system.

Inclusion body myositis usually begins with weakness in the legs, hands, or, sometimes, the swallowing muscles. Eventually it gets around to all of them and a lot more however. One of the results is you may lose the ability to roll over in bed. That happened to me several years ago leaving me vulnerable to skin problems. Eventually they got bad enough to need nursing help from a home health agency. One of the first things they did was order a low air loss alternating pressure mattress. It consists of 20 air filled chambers that take turns fully inflating. They also are constantly releasing a small amount of air to keep the skin supplied with oxygen. These two functions worked very well for me and also provided the best sleep I have had in years.

Unfortunately, as I reported in a post two years ago, once I was getting better, Medicare took away the mattress. As we all know, Medicare takes little interest in preventing illness, preferring to spend much more money once we get sick enough.You can read the entire original story here.

To get around their silly game I bought my own mattress on Amazon, exactly like the one they had provided. I paid just a few dollars more ($600) for the entire mattress and pump system than Medicare was paying each month.

After two years of good service, the pump that put air into the mattress gave out. (Actually, just a cheap little pressure gauge failed but that was enough to make the entire mattress stop working.) The point is what happened for the next four days until my replacement system arrived.

At first, I felt I had only two choices: don’t sleep on a completely deflated mattress, or don’t sleep on one so overinflated it feels like concrete. For the first two nights, I got no sleep whatsoever. Then on the third night I worked out a system where I could use a remote control in bed to turn the pump on and off. Of course I needed to be awake to do this effectivelyWhich turned out to be not difficult since there was almost always an alarm sounded. On those nights I got two or three hours of sleep each. Regardless, each morning my backside would be as sore as if I had been taken to the principal’s office several times.

I guess you can call this a backhanded testimonial to the efficacy of a low air loss alternating pressure mattress. In fact, you might want to buy two.

Aug 122013
 

After years of dealing with Medicare, I have managed to distill their process into this simple card.

My latest healthcare adventures have involved Medicare. The Scripps Health system managed to get into the act again as well.

Case 1: Inclusion body myositis has left me completely immobile when I sleep at night. This makes me very susceptible to pressure sores. I had developed several and was being treated by a home health nurse who told me she did not think she could make them get better as long as I was sleeping on my old mattress. It was not a cheap mattress by any means, it was a special pressure reducing mattress that cost $500. However, she told me I needed a mattress that would alternate the pressure and thus relieve susceptible areas. It also has a feature called low air loss in which tiny holes let air leak from the mattress and provide a source of oxygen to the skin which is also good for healing. She ordered the mattress through a local supplier to deliver immediately and it worked great. Within a couple of months my pressure sores were nearly gone and the home health nurse said she did not need to come back anymore. Right after that I got a call from the mattress supplier telling me that they were coming to get the mattress because Medicare would not pay for it as long as my sores were better. I said, “But my wounds will come back right away without it.” They assured me they knew that, but that is the way Medicare wants it.

In this case, rather than trying to go through a dysfunctional medical system, I simply went to Amazon, found the same mattress and ordered it. I was expecting it to be many thousands of dollars, since Medicare was paying several hundred dollars a month to rent it. However it actually only costs a few hundred dollars. (And people wonder why the Medicare system is in trouble!) Think about it: during just the time that I was renting the mattress, Medicare paid far more than it would cost to buy a brand-new one. In addition, Medicare’s policy was designed to force me to develop pressure sores all over again at which time I would again have to rent the mattress, and hire home health care again. Medicare pays approximately $200 per visit for the 15 min. that a nurse spends changing a dressing.

Case 2: I have been on a BiPAP system every night for the past 15 years. Not only is my breathing weak because of inclusion body myositis, but I also have severe sleep apnea which was diagnosed by UCSD. Recently Medicare instituted a new “competitive bidding” system which opens up each type of durable medical equipment to bidding from any company anywhere in the United States. This has left out most of the smaller companies that had always given people excellent service. In my case, it meant my provider could no longer furnish me with BiPAP supplies since they did not win at competitive bidding. I either had to go to another local company which has a terrible reputation for bad service or go to one of the out-of-state companies that won the bidding. Neither was a good option. However, if my need could be escalated another level to a constant volume type of BiPAP instead of a constant pressure type, it would not be subject to competitive bidding and I could retain my good supplier. The supplier was certain that I would qualify due to my advanced disease. So I went to the doctor at Scripps who sent me to their pulmonologist who really did not know much about my history but was skeptical as to whether I needed that kind of help. So now before I can qualify, I have to do overnight oximetry which entails two trips to Scripps clinic, one to pick up the equipment and the other to return it. In addition I must have several pulmonary function tests and a blood arterial gas test. Then, depending on the results, he may prescribe the more advanced equipment. All because a bunch of clerks of Medicare think they know how to practice medicine.

Meanwhile, politicians in Washington are arguing about whether Medicare benefits should be cut back. They rarely argue about whether the Medicare system should operate more intelligently.

If you came here from the later article about low air loss mattresses, here is where you get back.