Feb 132014
 

The paperback version of Rolling Back: Through a Life Disabled

The paperback version of Rolling Back: Through a Life Disabled

Rolling Back has been published in paperback and is available on Amazon for $6.99 ($6.64 for Amazon Prime members). There is also the Kindle version that costs $2.99. I have provided links to each of them below.

Writing and publishing Rolling Back as been a personally rewarding experience that I wouldn’t trade for anything. Several people have urged me to write another, and I will probably try. However I think I’m ready for a change of pace and may attempt a fiction novel next. I’d be interested to hear your thoughts.

Paperback:

Kindle:

Dec 192013
 

What if you liked to drive fast? And what if you couldn’t drive at all? What if the most exciting part of any trip was when you tried to negotiate your power chair onto the EZ-LOK system on the floor of your van?

Well, that’s basically my situation. But I do have a few advantages. I have a power wheelchair. It doesn’t go really fast, but I usually can catch up to most of the pedestrians on the sidewalk. More importantly, I have a GoPro camera that I can strap to my head or mount on the chair. And I have A brand-new iMac with Logic Pro X for manipulating sound and creating music plus Final Cut Pro X for editing video. Put it altogether, and what might be the result?

You are about to find out, provided you click on the video link below. It only lasts a minute and half, but it might give you a whole new idea of what life in an assisted living community could be like.

I call it Huntington Raceway Lap. You will see why.

Enjoy.

Jul 232013
 

A photo of Earth taken from nearly a billion miles away by Cassini orbiting Saturn. I am in the picture.

Living with a progressive untreatable disability like inclusion body myositis can be very difficult, but it is not rocket science––or is it? Friday, July 19, I toured the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena California, and shot lots of video footage with my new GoPro Hero 3 Black camera. It just happened to be the day that the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn was going to take a picture of Earth. Many of the employees of JPL were out in the courtyard waving for the picture. You cannot see them in the video but you can hear them. I also included the picture that Cassini took of Earth, with the assumption that I am in the shot. The shakiness in the video comes from my inability to hold my hands very steady. I should have used my helmet mount, but I thought that might give security some problems.

Now about the rocket science. To begin with, it turns out the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is no longer that concerned with jet propulsion other than hitching a ride with a rocket to get to where they need to go. Their main focus these days is on robotics. Their mission control center is all about sending and receiving signals through millions and even billions of miles of space. For example, the photograph that is on this page and featured in the video showing Earth as seen from Saturn, was taken by the Cassini orbiter. if you wanted to be in the photograph (not that anybody would really know you were) you needed to be facing Saturn and smiling and waving about one hour and 20 min. before Cassini actually snapped the shutter. That is how long it takes the light waves to get from Earth to Saturn.

But on a more down to earth example, the camera I used, my GoPro, is a marvel of technology in its own right. Slightly larger than a matchbox and not much heavier, it can shoot video that is 4000 pixels wide and I control it with my iPhone. Despite being unable to move my fingers, I was able to compose a fairly complex score to go with the video using Logic Pro software on my iMac and a Korg Nanokey keyboard that is perfect for me since the keys merely need to be touched. The video editing was done using Final Cut Pro X, an amazing software program that puts the equivalent of a million-dollar video production studio onto my desktop for a cost of about $300. Finally, I am dictating this entire blog, along with tens of thousands of words that I have recently written for books in progress using Dragon Dictate voice-recognition software.

Thank you scientists everywhere, and please keep these wonderful innovations coming!

Jul 212013
 

Mike wearing GoPro

Here I am wearing my new camera. I just have to be careful not to nod my head if somebody waves to me!

Every time I think I have hit upon a pastime that I can continue to pursue despite the progression of my illness, I discover how wrong I was. When I was forced to give up work, I took up painting. That lasted for 10 years until my arms and hands became too weak to guide a brush. So I decided to take up writing a blog. But that meant I had to overcome the weakness of my fingers – fortunately voice-recognition was improving and it is a pretty good substitute. However the other part of writing a blog is photography. Over the past few months my hands and arms have become too weak to hold the camera or cell phone and press a shutter. Since part of my new “job” now that I am living at Huntington Manor assisted living is maintaining their website and blog, photography is a very important part of my work. I was about ready to throw up my hands and quit (except I cannot throw up my hands anymore) but then I was watching a NASCAR race and one of the cars was sponsored by GoPro. I had heard the name before and knew that it was some kind of camera system, so I looked it up on the Internet. I discovered that the GoPro was a very compact camera that had been designed by surfers to allow them to make videos of their rides. It soon spread in popularity and was used by skateboarders, skiers, model airplane builders, free base jumpers, and just about anyone who wished to make a video record of their exploits. It came with a waterproof housing of course but that did not interest me so much. What really caught my attention was both its light weight and the fact that it could be controlled remotely using an iPhone app.

I visited my favorite store (Amazon.com), read about the various models and ordered the GoPro Black, the one with the highest resolution. I also ordered the special mounting system that goes around the head. Now I have a camera system that I can take with me without having to hold it in my hands, and I control all of its functions from my iPhone resting on my lap. I have been using it for a couple of weeks now and have already produced a major video for Huntington Manor as well as taking the number of other photographs. It does not have a zoom, but it has the capability of taking very high resolution video, double the size of high-definition, which means that I can use video editing software to zoom in on sections that I have shot, without winding up with fuzzy, pixelated video. Below are my first videos produced using this camera.

I have included this link to the GoPro camera description on Amazon in case anyone is interested in getting one for themselves. There are three different models, but I highly recommend getting the highest resolution “Black” model which would then allow zooming in postproduction.

This is a video I made about the Huntington Manor Summer Picnic. It includes the food preparation in the kitchen as well as the event itself. All the video was shot with the GoPro camera, and edited using Final Cut Pro Xon my iMac. The background music was created using Band in a Box, The only way I can create music these days is using that program. I can use one finger to type in the chords and a simple melody and it does the rest.

Here is another video shot with the GoPro. I placed it near the bird feeders at Huntington Manor and from a distance waited for the goldfinches to arrive and then started the camera recording. The video was shot at 120 frames per second to produce the slow-motion effect.