Mar 042014
 

bookdessert
I was just finishing a follow-up visit at the wound care center, when I mentioned my book to the nurses. One of them asked how much it was and I told her it was $2.99 for the Kindle edition. “Is that too much?” I asked her. “What if it was free?”

“That would make the difference of whether I had dessert with my meal that day,” she said.

“Well in that case, the Kindle edition will be free starting this Thursday for five days.” (One thing I have learned is that it is always important to keep on the good side of your nurses.)

Because I enrolled my book in a program called “Kindle Direct Publishing Select,” I have the option of setting the price for the Kindle edition to “free” for a five day period. They offer this as a way to widen the audience for a book. The downsides are that you lose out on the royalties during this time and you risk getting some unfavorable reviews as people who may not be especially interested in such a narrow topic may feel they didn’t get their “money’s worth.”

I am hoping this promotion will also help expand awareness of inclusion body myositis and myotonic dystrophy. So it is well worth my cost.

If you haven’t want my book yet and if the reason you were holding back was at all related to the cost, please take advantage of this promotion. It starts Thursday, March 6 and ends Monday, March 10. The free book offer is only available for the Kindle edition and not the paperback which will remain available at its regular price of $6.99. (See the link to the left of this post.)

Feb 072014
 
Here is the cover for the paperback version of my book.

As most of you know (I hope) I have published the Kindle edition of Rolling Back: Through a Life Disabled. (You can see the Amazon listing by clicking on the link at the bottom of this post.) I had assumed that most people were now reading books electronically. However I quickly learned that many of you prefer to read books that you can hold in your hands, turn the pages, etc.
I remember those days. Unfortunately I’m no longer able to do that. But the good news is that there now are so many options available for reading on a screen. I am too weak to even hold a Kindle so I use the Kindle Reader on my computer. I have also recently signed up for a wonderful service through the local library called BookShare. It is for people like me who are not capable of holding a book. It is also for the blind. Once you have established your disability and have been accepted into the program, you can scroll through all of the books that a regular library might hold and select ones you want to read. They’re delivered instantly to your computer where you can either read them on the screen, or listen to them. I am very grateful that this program exists.

This is how I read (the 27 inch iMac) and how I write (microphone for voice recognition).

This is how I read (the 27 inch iMac) and how I write (microphone for voice recognition).

The paperback version of my book should be published in about three weeks. It has been a much more complicated process than publishing for Amazon Kindle. Both versions recommend that you work with Microsoft Word, but the publishing process for a paperback needs everything formatted to the exact size of the finished book.
Once the paperback is available you will notice its price is more than double that of the Kindle version. ($6.99 for the paperback versus $2.99 for Kindle.) This simply reflects the printing costs involved in producing a 134 page book with a full-color cover. If you’re curious, my royalty is greater for the Kindle version. I have received some kind reviews about my book. Thank you!

Aug 042012
 

Note: At the time this series of articles was written, my wife Beth was still with us. She died October 11, 2012.

There is downsizing, and then there is moving to assisted living. Downsizing presents difficult choices of what to keep and what to take with you. Moving to assisted living presents impossible choices.

One way we managed to deal with it was to simply not make many of the decisions. Instead we had our daughters go through our stuff and make a lot of the choices for us, without us being present. Did we agree with every choice? Of course not. But it at least it let us whittle things down to a manageable size.

Another way to approach it is to choose between what you really need and what you think you simply can’t live without. In my case, since I knew I was going to continue to do work in the website design and graphics arts field, I definitely had to take all of my computer gear and cameras. Plus my manuals on software and programming. Beth wanted all of her art supplies, of course.

How do you downsize this?

How do you downsize this?

Clothing was also easier for me, since I really can’t wear standard clothes anymore. I just needed to bring along half a dozen of my specially constructed pants, and a dozen or so shirts. Plus some jackets.

Beth wanted to bring enough to fill several closets so we compromised by storing winter clothes off site and bringing all of her summer clothes. Then we will have to make the switch in the fall and hope we guess right on the weather. I also gave her half of my closet for coats.

Then there are the keepsakes. How could we possibly get rid of any of the vases that people had given us over the years? Well we had to, and every few days we will remember one that would’ve been just perfect for a particular location or occasion. The other really big issue was Christmas decorations. We have been allowed to store some here underneath the facility in their basement, but that still begs the question of what we will do with them come holidays. Perhaps we will be able to use some in a common area here at Huntington Manor.

It’s my belief that the key to this whole process is to try your best to live in the present. Every time we start thinking about things we left behind it becomes difficult. But in truth, nothing we left behind is needed for our daily lives. And the real memories aren’t stored in vases or garment bags. They are in the mind.

Which reminds me to return to working on my first book, “The Society of the Creek.” It is a book about childhood, written for an adult audience. I plan to post some excerpts here.

Index for this series of articles about assisted living.

Introductory article plus updates.

Is it time for assisted living?

Making the decision to move to assisted living, emotionally, practically and financially.

How we chose the facility we did.

Deciding what to take, what to leave, how to adjust our expectations.

What life in assisted living has been like.

How can we make assisted living better for the physically disabled?