Jan 292013
 

Two and one half years later and no longer able to paint, I'm trying to learn how to use the iPad and iPhone from the inside out.

I hope those who visit my blog from time to time will pardon my recent lack of activity. Some of the earliest readers may recall my chapter that dealt with rewriting life’s script when things don’t go the way you expected or hoped. Well I am once again needing to tear up the pages, or maybe hit the delete key, and put in some fresh paper (or RAM space).

The recent death of my wife left a big hole in every day and in every concept of my future. Couple that with the recent severe decline of strength in my upper body which deprived me of the joy of painting and I have been in a bit of a bad space lately. I realized that I needed a new challenge, one that relied more on mental gymnastics than the other kind. So I gave myself the improbable task of learning to write applications for the iPhone and iPad. Of course as soon as I got into trying to learn about that, I discovered how little I really knew about programming. So for the past few weeks I have been trying to learn C, C++, and Objective-C, along with the Apple integrated development environment called Xcode.

Fear not, I have not wandered off into some digital wilderness, as I fully intend to use my new skills, once acquired, to develop an app or two related to disability and to assisted living. I also might try to develop something related to the two diseases that I know so well – myotonic muscular dystrophy, which claimed my wife, and inclusion body myositis, which is trying to claim me.

I even might have some fun with an art application. But, first things first, I still have a lot of learning to do. So these days and nights I sit in my room at the assisted-living facility and watch instructional videos and try to do the exercises. It’s sort of like being back in college except I’m not eager to graduate.

Although I can no longer physically produce tools and garments that assist with the life of a disabled person, I can still think about things that might be useful. I am also going to be doing more articles soon about life in an assisted living facility, as it is really quite an adventure.

I am enjoying getting to know more about my late wife's early years.

The new blog site I am creating in memory of my wife, Beth Shirk, is underway. You are welcome to follow its progress.

Mike

Oct 142012
 

Beth at Art Reception

Beth at an art reception last year.

Three nights ago I got those terrible phone calls. The first was from my wife’s new assisted-living facility. She was being rushed to the hospital. The second call was from my daughter who was on her way to meet the ambulance and said she would send her husband to get me. When I got inside the emergency room my daughter met me and said “brace yourself, it’s very bad”. Beth, my wife of 38 years was lying on the bed, a ventilation mask over her face, her chest heaving in response to the high amount of pressure they were using to force air and oxygen into her lungs. My daughter explained that without that she could not survive. Although my wife had a Do Not Resuscitate order, my daughter made the decision to allow them to take this extra step to keep her alive until I could be at her bedside and to give us time to bring our two daughters down from Orange County.

So we talked with her as her body struggled. She managed one-syllable answers and at one point opened her eyes and squeezed my hand. Then our daughters arrived and we gathered around and told Beth how much we loved her (although there really were no words that could possibly say how very much that was).

Beth on the beach with our daughters.

Each summer Beth and our daughters would stay at the beach in La Jolla for a couple of glorious weeks.


The doctor gave her pain killer and a sedative, then removed the mask. We held Beth and continued to talk with her as she struggled to breathe on her own. All too soon, she took her last breath and I felt her fingers relax their hold on mine. My wife, my soulmate, the mother of our children, was gone.

As I write this, there is no way to describe the agony. If I could, I would change places with her in an instant, but I can’t. Somehow I have to make sense of a life that doesn’t include Beth and try to use the time I have left to continue to write and help the world know more about the wonderful woman it has lost.

Spring Ahead Watermedia Painting by Beth Shirk

One of Beth's last works of art, Spring Ahead won many awards and now hangs in my room.