Nutrition

Jun 192015
 

There seems to be some optimism for the future of the new Novartis drug BYM338 currently under investigation for its efficacy and safety as a treatment of inclusion body myositis.There is nothing official, but anecdotal remarks from study participants and others who may have connections within the study point toward encouraging news.

I have heard some people speculate that even if BYM338 is proven effective, it is too late for those of us with more advanced disease. I would like to express a contrary opinion.

My inclusion body myositis has progressed quite far yet I still see potential benefit that could come from BYM338 should it prove effective. After nearly 30 years with IBM (19 since diagnosis) all of my muscles have been affected to some extent. The earliest affected muscles are the worst, such as the quadriceps and finger flexors, but all the rest are gradually growing weaker. At this point, each loss of muscle results in a significant loss of function. For example, the weakness in my diaphragm and core muscles is significantly reducing my ability to breathe and sit upright. The last time my inspiration and expiration strength were measured two years ago, both were only 30% of the low limit of normal. In the past few years, the additional loss of strength in my biceps took away my ability to feed myself using normal motions and forced me to adapt to a slinging motion combined with tilting back in my wheelchair. The point is that once IBM has progressed far enough to cause the ability to walk or stand to be lost, this is far from an endpoint with the illness. I still am able to recruit other muscles to accomplish most of my crucial activities of daily living beyond walking through creativity and use of mechanical aids.

I can also tell that even my most seriously affected muscles still have enough living cells within them to produce tiny movements. After all, a muscle consists of many bundles of muscle fibers which themselves consist of many muscle cells. The point is that even a slight gain in strength and muscle that has been mostly destroyed could still contribute to an adaptation that is important to the patient. Or a slight additional loss of strength could cause that adaptation to be lost.

In my own case, preserving or strengthening certain shoulder muscles could allow me to continue feeding myself indefinitely. Preserving or strengthening remaining healthy muscle fibers in the diaphragm and rib cage could allow me to avoid full-time ventilation. Each of these would be benefits that could easily justify an expensive medication.

If anyone knows how to get this observation in front of any researchers or Novartis executives, please do.

Feb 132014
 

The paperback version of Rolling Back: Through a Life Disabled

The paperback version of Rolling Back: Through a Life Disabled

Rolling Back has been published in paperback and is available on Amazon for $6.99 ($6.64 for Amazon Prime members). There is also the Kindle version that costs $2.99. I have provided links to each of them below.

Writing and publishing Rolling Back as been a personally rewarding experience that I wouldn’t trade for anything. Several people have urged me to write another, and I will probably try. However I think I’m ready for a change of pace and may attempt a fiction novel next. I’d be interested to hear your thoughts.

Paperback:

Kindle:

Feb 042014
 

This is the cover for my new book. The art is a slightly modified version of one of my late wife's paintings.

This is the cover for my new book. The art is a slightly modified version of one of my late wife’s paintings.

My book, Rolling Back: Through a Life Disabled, has been published and is available as a Kindle version on Amazon. You don’t need a Kindle to read it, you can read it on any computer or any tablet for smart phone using the free Kindle app. Kindle owners who are Amazon Prime members can borrow it for free.

Rolling Back will be available as a paperback in a few weeks. Right now it is only in the Kindle format, but will be expanded to include other e-readers in three months. The price for the Kindle version is just $2.99. If cost is an issue I hope to be able to offer it free for five days on Amazon. When that happens, I will let everyone know.

Dec 082013
 
Using my techniques, I am now able to eat a varied diet.

Using my techniques, I am now able to eat a varied diet.

Like most people with inclusion body myositis, I have weak swallowing muscles. This causes me to have trouble forcing food to go down the esophagus and as result it will try to go down my trachea. Over the years I have had several swallowing studies including two at UCSD Medical Center. These merely confirmed what I already knew, however they also allowed me to see, by way of the fluoroscopic studies, exactly what was going on. I was able to see that the food got trapped in pockets near my vocal chords. This explained why, when I would try to speak while eating or shortly afterwards, I would almost always end up choking and having a violent coughing spell.

The doctors had several suggestions, including having my throat expanded, or having Botox injections, or even stopping eating altogether and having a feeding tube inserted in my stomach. I have known people who have pursued each of those routes. The first two generally do not produce lasting results and the feeding tube would require a higher level of care. So I decided to take what I learned and figure out a way to eat successfully. I’ve been observed by a speech therapist while eating and he said that I was using the techniques that he would normally teach to someone to help them overcome swallowing difficulties. With that kind of encouragement, I have decided to publish a video showing me eating accompanied by my own explanation in the hopes that it might help others who are struggling with this problem.

As always, I caution you that I am not a medical professional and that this is not medical advice. I am simply showing you what works for me and I cannot predict whether it will work for you.