Apr 142016
 
Back where I belong.

Huntington Manor assisted living in Poway, California.

I recently returned to Huntington Manor assisted living after spending 15 months at a much larger, more expensive facility which I will refer to as “The Other Place.” People have wondered why I came back to Huntington Manor and, if I like it better here, why did I move in the first place? These are good questions and my answers may interest you.

Huntington Manor is a 27-bed assisted living facility located on the outskirts of Poway, California. My wife and I moved here in the spring of 2012 because it was the only place we could find that would accept my overhead lift system and was priced low enough that we could afford two rooms. My wife died a few months later but I remained here for another two years. I liked the location, had become friends with the owner, had gotten to know the staff well and enjoyed working on their website and blog.

Is this all there is?

My family felt that I was not taking advantage of some of the extra amenities that were available in larger facilities. So every once in a while I would check out a few of them, however I always got the same answer, “Sorry, but we can’t take care of someone as disabled as you and we definitely don’t want your overhead lifts in our facility.”

One day I was told about a place near the coast that might accept my physical requirements and my lifts so I checked them out. Like the other large facilities, they promised an extensive activities program, restaurant–style dining, frequent excursions, and several common areas where residents could mingle. When I asked about my overhead lifts, they said they would have to check it out with “corporate.” At the time I didn’t know exactly what that meant but I certainly do now. After several weeks they told me I was approved. But could I afford to live there?

Large assisted living facility

Could I afford to live this large?

Sticker shock.

Do you ever see those reports about assisted living that show the average cost by state and think “that’s not so bad.” It wouldn’t be if those were the actual costs, but sadly they are not. When the larger facilities publish costs or give them out over the telephone they are quoting the base rate for a room and the most standard care level available. (Smaller facilities are less likely to use this tactic.) There are very few people entering assisted living who could live with that amount of care. If you have difficulty transferring or walking or keeping track of appointments and medicines or dressing or feeding yourself, you will pay a lot more. The way it works is the facility will do an “assessment” and assign points for each type of care you need. Would you like help taking a shower? Do you have difficulty cutting meat? Do you have other bathroom issues? Based on the number of points, they will assess you an additional daily rate. In my case, the basic charge for the room was $140 per day, but the added charge for providing me assistance was $80 per day. That meant I would be paying $6600 per month for those months with 30 days — much more than I was paying at Huntington Manor. Nevertheless, they were advertising so many extra services that I felt I should try it out.

Corporate greed trumps senior need.

If I had known what was going on behind the scenes, I would have made a different decision. I had been given the standard story –a married couple started this chain of facilities out of a desire to create lodging for seniors that felt more like homes and less like hospitals. This was true, and from the stories I heard from people who had worked there for many years, life used to be very good for both the staff and the residents. But then came the economic downturns and the big corporations smelled blood in the water. Today The Other Place is owned by a real estate investment trust (REIT) that packaged several hundred senior living facilities together and offers shares to investors. They have no interest in the business or the residents — but they certainly worry about their shareholders. They contract with large property management corporations to run each of the facilities as profitably as possible. How do you get more profits? You cut costs and raise rates.

I experienced the cost-cutting first. This showed up in the number and quality of the activities offered, the quality of the food, and the number of caregivers available.

Activities – not my idea of good times.

The main reason my family wanted me to move to a large facility was for the activities. Even before the cost-cutting, I discovered that most of the activities were designed around the needs of people who were much older and especially for those who were suffering from early stages of memory loss. I’m sure my children picture me have a lively conversations, going to movies, developing close friendships, etc. Sadly, that did not turn out to be the case. Most of the activities focused on either playing bingo, or playing simple word games. There were crafts every couple of weeks but they were usually at the level of early elementary school. I understand that I was not the target audience for their program. Assisted living activities programs are mostly for people who are over the age of 80, female and with some form of cognitive difficulties.

The one program I truly enjoyed was the music. They brought in professional musicians who performed and encouraged residents to join in singing. Of course that cost money and it was one of the the first programs to be affected by budget cuts. The number of acts was cut in half and some performers just quit coming because the pay was too low. There were monthly excursions and weekly trips to local restaurants but I preferred my wheelchair and public transit for the independence it gave me. Besides, many of the residents needed to be watched carefully, so any trips away from the facility required at least one caregiver for every two residents to make sure no one wandered off. This limited the number of participants to about ten residents.

Dining

I had heard stories about the elegant dinners they used to serve, and you still see pictures of food from those events posted on their website. I never saw any personally however because by the time I arrived all menus were being planned from the central headquarters back east and the local chef was given almost no authority to change the menu or improve the quality of food being offered. In fact, the menus were printed a month in advance and shipped to the facility to be displayed for each meal. After a few weeks, everything seemed to taste the same. That was because many of the foods were based on the same packaged ingredients. For example soups were made from one of four stock bases. Very few items were cut from scratch in the kitchen.

No turkey loafing at Huntington Manor.

No turkey loafing at Huntington Manor.

At Huntington Manor, the first step in making chicken soup is to boil some chicken. At The Other Place, most turkey or ham dinners come from deli loafs of turkey or ham. Here, they come from turkeys and hams.

Cuts in caregiving.

Perhaps the saddest result of corporate greed is what happened to the caregivers and their relationships with residents. When I arrived there were seven or eight caregivers on duty during the daytime hours. They were charged with caring for approximately 70 residents. By the time I left, many days there were only five caregivers for the same number of residents. If you are doing the math you’ll see this works out to one caregiver for every 14 residents. Subtract from that the several hours per day they must spend on other tasks such as working in the dining room and there is obviously little time to get to know a resident well. By contrast, at Huntington Manor we have five caregivers on duty during the daytime for 27 residents – – an average of about one caregiver for every five residents. At night, the contrast is even more dramatic. The Other Place has two caregivers on duty at night for all 70 residents. Huntington Manor has three on duty for 27 residents.

At both facilities, the people who actually provide the care are competent and hard-working. Many of them truly enjoy what they do and like to help people. Because the pay levels are so low they typically work two or more jobs to support their families. They deserve our respect. Unfortunately many of the residents have personality disorders that go along with dementia, making them difficult to care for. In my four years of living in facilities, I have never experienced any kind of abuse but I have certainly seen caregivers on the receiving end of it.

Where does the payroll go?

Something else that comes along with bloated corporate ownership is bloated staff. It’s wasteful but may be necessary to keep up with the record-keeping and regulatory demands of a big corporation. Where I am now we have four staff who are seldom involved in direct patient care: the owner, the administrator, the cleaning person and the gardener. At The Other Place most of the common areas are filled with offices. There is the executive director plus people in charge of the business office, sales, assisted living, intermediate memory care, health services, activities, food service, maintenance, and reception. Many of these have their own staff. Every two months or so a carload of impeccably dressed executives descends on the managers and hovers over them making sure every procedure is carried out according to the corporate book. I’m sure the regional managers fly back to headquarters every so often for some of the same treatment. Almost lost from sight are the five or so caregivers themselves.

The big price increase.

When I was negotiating the price for The Other Place, I was given a chart showing price increases during the past several years. They averaged about 2% which made me feel comfortable that I could manage them. After a year I got my first actual price increase. It was just under 10%! Doing some investigating, I learned that a dollar increase of about the same amount was likely for the following year. There was no way I could afford to live here unless I changed to one of the smallest rooms. To do that I would need to reinstall my overhead lifts – an expense of about $2000 and adjust to a cramped lifestyle and wait for the next round of cost cutting and price increases. It so happened that I heard from Huntington Manor the next day asking if I would like to return. I really didn’t have to think twice. So now I am back here and far happier. I miss my favorite caregiver at The Other Place but I am back with good friends that I had here before. If only I had known all of this beforehand, it would have saved me tens of thousands of dollars.

Conclusion:

Despite my experience, I am not recommending people avoid larger facilities. For their target audience, they are providing the services those people seek and can afford to pay for. If someone has Alzheimer’s disease, it could be a very good choice. However, for those of us whose challenge is mostly loss of mobility, we may need to be more creative in our selection process. The big chains now control the largest portion of assisted living beds, but there are many intermediate and small privately owned facilities. Here in California, six-bed Residential Care For the Elderly (RCFE) properties are everywhere. They are less strictly regulated and can offer personally tailored types of care sometimes at significantly less cost. I was unable to find one that could meet my needs, but not many people are as mobility-challenged as I am. If you are facing the prospect of needing more care then you can receive at home, don’t be discouraged. During these past four years the good moments have far outweighed the bad and I’m looking forward to more.

Mike Shirk

  13 Responses to “Adventures in Assisted Living: What I Have Learned Could Save You Plenty.”

  1. Thank you Mike for you providing a path that some of us have to travel.You have courage that I can only hope to have.

  2. Thanks, it was very informative.

  3. Thanks Mike for sharing your thoughts and insight! And, thanks for posting the link on the IBM forum — mms

  4. Mike,
    No one has prepared me for my IBM journey as well as you have. Includes both practical advice and also a positive perspective. Thank you for this update!

  5. Mike,
    Thank you for this very informative look at assisted living facilities. I know that the day will come when I will have to make a decision on whether to continue to live in my house. Bless you Mike for all you do.

    Mike,
    Thank your for this very informative look at assisted living facilities. I know that the day will come when I an no longer live in my house and I have been reading about
    various places. Bless you for keeping us informed.

  6. Mike,
    Thank you so much for your update of assisted living facilities. Your ability to evaluate your situation and adjust is a lesson to all of us with IBM. The needs of those without cognitive impairment are certainly different. Despite all your physical problems you always challenge yourself and are continuing to learn whether it be through your art or just adapting to the next physical challenge in the best way. You are a true inspiration to us all.
    Thank you,
    Irene Morganson

  7. Thank you for the insight of nursing homes.

  8. Thank you for all the information I got a lot of good advice even though I live in Australia. I will also in the future need lifting and the part you said about programs is true.I am happy with having a broader outlook for my future thanks again.

  9. I can’t thank you enough for the most informative insights about your experiences with Assisted Living. You paint a very clear picture about what to be aware of for those of us who will follow in your “footsteps”!

  10. Thanks to everyone for your comments. My thanks go to all who take the time to read my blog and my book. it may seem that I am doing this out of the goodness of my heart, but it only seems that way. The truth is, this writing has given my life purpose which keeps me from falling into despair (which would be easy enough to do). Hearing that what I do is worthwhile keeps me going.

  11. Very well written piece. I am happy that you extended your positive thoughts about the caregivers. They are the backbone; and can never receive enough praise.

  12. Thank you, Mike! We’ve been navigating the caregiving process for my elderly parents who together are loosing mobility and cognitive skills at an alarming rate. We’ve chosen to bring care into their home of 65 years for now, at their request. Your experience at The Other Place is familiar: my mother-in-law witnessed 5 years of declining services and increasing prices as her Place changed ownership from private to corporate. We also watched the amount of family monitoring that was required of another Napa nursing home so that the patient received what they paid for. We will certainly be on the lookout for a suitable RCFE property when my parents need it.

  13. While these patient lifts have been quite popular in European countries for some time, they are starting to pop-up in the home care, assisted living and emergency management services sectors in the United States. These types of lifts are not intimidating to the patient, nor are they bulky and heavy to move around. I think they deserve a strong look by the risk managers and caregivers in these areas to protect the patient, while assisting to mitigate / reduce worker’s compensation claims. Heritage Properties in Michigan implemented these and saw an 80% reduction in claims during the first 12 months. These’s something to say for that! Examples can be seen at http://www.mobilepatientlifts.com

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