Jun 192015
 

There seems to be some optimism for the future of the new Novartis drug BYM338 currently under investigation for its efficacy and safety as a treatment of inclusion body myositis.There is nothing official, but anecdotal remarks from study participants and others who may have connections within the study point toward encouraging news.

I have heard some people speculate that even if BYM338 is proven effective, it is too late for those of us with more advanced disease. I would like to express a contrary opinion.

My inclusion body myositis has progressed quite far yet I still see potential benefit that could come from BYM338 should it prove effective. After nearly 30 years with IBM (19 since diagnosis) all of my muscles have been affected to some extent. The earliest affected muscles are the worst, such as the quadriceps and finger flexors, but all the rest are gradually growing weaker. At this point, each loss of muscle results in a significant loss of function. For example, the weakness in my diaphragm and core muscles is significantly reducing my ability to breathe and sit upright. The last time my inspiration and expiration strength were measured two years ago, both were only 30% of the low limit of normal. In the past few years, the additional loss of strength in my biceps took away my ability to feed myself using normal motions and forced me to adapt to a slinging motion combined with tilting back in my wheelchair. The point is that once IBM has progressed far enough to cause the ability to walk or stand to be lost, this is far from an endpoint with the illness. I still am able to recruit other muscles to accomplish most of my crucial activities of daily living beyond walking through creativity and use of mechanical aids.

I can also tell that even my most seriously affected muscles still have enough living cells within them to produce tiny movements. After all, a muscle consists of many bundles of muscle fibers which themselves consist of many muscle cells. The point is that even a slight gain in strength and muscle that has been mostly destroyed could still contribute to an adaptation that is important to the patient. Or a slight additional loss of strength could cause that adaptation to be lost.

In my own case, preserving or strengthening certain shoulder muscles could allow me to continue feeding myself indefinitely. Preserving or strengthening remaining healthy muscle fibers in the diaphragm and rib cage could allow me to avoid full-time ventilation. Each of these would be benefits that could easily justify an expensive medication.

If anyone knows how to get this observation in front of any researchers or Novartis executives, please do.

  4 Responses to “If There is a New Treatment for IBM, Will it Be Too Late for Some of Us?”

  1. Great news, Mike.\
    How can I help?

  2. Can’t believe it !!! Wouldn’t it be just great !! Would love this so much for you ! ????

  3. Can’t believe it !!! Wouldn’t it be just great !! Would love this so much for you ! ????

  4. Hi Mike,
    Thanks very much for your thoughtful article.
    I have always been impressed by your creative ability and desire to share your ideas with others of us. Your positive attitude is enviable.

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